Study Suggests U.S. Colleges Fail to Challenge Undergrads

In response to Monday’s post on a study by the CLA, here’s more:

When you pay thousands of dollars for a college education, you expect to learn something in return. Right? Well, you may be disappointed to hear what’s happening—or not—on college campuses according to a new study out today.

The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) just released a report, Improving Undergraduate Learning: Findings and Policy Recommendations from the College Learning Assessment Longitudinal Study, and a book discussing the study’s results, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses.

The study—the first large-scale national survey of its kind—is based on an analysis of about 2,300 undergraduates at 24 four-year institutions to measure students’ learning and study habits.

Traditional-age college freshmen from schools varying in size, selectivity, and missions, from liberal arts colleges to large research institutions, were contacted in the fall of 2005, in 2007 during their sophomore year, and again in the spring of 2009 to take a survey and the College Learning Assessment. The CLA measures general competencies, such as critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and written communication. It included three, open-ended prompts. Students used background documents to respond to a real-world scenario and solve a dilemma. (For more detail about the CLA, go here.)

Read more>>
To download the publication:
Improving Undergraduate Learning: Findings and Policy Recommendations from the SSRC-CLA Longitudinal Project (must be in Internet Explorer)

To read the discussion surrounding this controversial new book (Academically Adrift)  from the Education Research Program click here.

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Posted in Data/Research, Students. Tags: , , . Comments Off on Study Suggests U.S. Colleges Fail to Challenge Undergrads
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