More California Latinos Are College Grads

More California Latinos are graduating from college, according to a state profile by Excelencia in Education. The number of Latinos earning undergraduate degrees grew by 13 percent in the state between 2006 and 2008, while other groups saw an 8 percent increase.

However, the college gap is large: Only 16 percent of Latino adults are college graduates, compared to 39 percent of all working-age adults in the state.

Some 75 percent of Latino college students are enrolled in community colleges, which have low graduation rates. Looking just at first-time, full-time college students, the Latino completion rate is 35 percent, compared to 47 percent for similar white students, the profile found.

Several pilot programs are boosting Latino success rates, Excelencia notes.

The group suggests that California policy makers focus on closing the gap through programs that provide institutional support for community-college students transferring to four-year institutions, like the University of California’s Puente Project, or peer and faculty mentoring, such as California State Polytechnic University’s Science Educational Enhancement Services.

Excelencia’s state profiles are funded by the Gates Foundation, the Lumina Foundation for Educationand the Kresge Foundation.

“A combination of low college enrollment coupled with low college completion rates spells disaster for Latinos and the California economy precisely at a time when we are predicted to face a shortage of one million more college graduates by 2025,” said Michele Siqueiros, executive director of Campaign for College Opportunity, in response to the Excelencia report. Read more>>

Via Joanne Jacobs, Community College Spotlight.

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College Board Finds Minority Men Continue to Lag Academically

The College Board is releasing two reports today on the crisis facing young black and Latino men, who, the reports find, continue to be measurably less educated than minority women and white men.

According to the reports, 16 percent of Latino and 28 percent of African-American men  ages 25 to 34 had obtained an associate’s degree or higher as of 2008, while the comparable figure for white men was 44 percent and for Asian men,  70 percent.

The report also said that foreign-born members of those lagging minority groups were more likely to drop out than those born in the United States, especially in the case of Hispanics. While the total dropout rate for male Latinos is 20 percent, the foreign-born dropout rate is 14 percentage points higher.

“The Educational Experience of Young Men: A Review of Research, Pathways, and Progress” draws on statistics from the Census Bureau and other research documents, highlighting the need for change in the education sector. The report often compares the statistical success of men versus women. In almost every case, women are shown to have received more education.

The data about Asian/Pacific Islander men is particularly noteworthy. The authors cite the “model minority myth”— the assumption that a minority group is the superior, or “model,” group — and then challenge it, emphasizing that Asian men face problems similar to those of other minorities.

Read more.

Posted in Data/Research, Postsecondary (13-18). Tags: , , , , , , , . Comments Off on College Board Finds Minority Men Continue to Lag Academically